Logitech MX Master Mouse Review And Unboxing

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We’re going to check out the MX Master mouse from Logitech and find out how it performs, that’s coming up next. The MX Master is a wireless mouse from Logitech. I’ve previously used the MX Revolution and MX Performance mice from Logitech, so I was interested when I found out that the MX Master had been released.

The overall shape, theme and design seems to be pretty similar which I like, but there are a few interesting changes this time around that we’ll check out here. Inside the box we have the mouse itself, a USB receiver, Micro USB cable for charging, and instruction manual. Let’s take a quick physical tour of the mouse. It’s 48.4mm high, 126mm in width and 85.7mm in depth. The total weight comes in at 145g, while the receiver is only 2g.

MX Master mouse
MX Master mouse

Most of the action is on the left hand side, the most noticeable addition of which is the return of the side scroll wheel. I didn’t even realise that I’d missed this until I had it back, the scrolling action is very smooth and nice and can be used to scroll left and right. Behind the side scroll wheel are the back and forward buttons. Initially I felt these were a little too far back as I had to move my thumb back more than I was used to in order to reach them, however I’ve become more used to this over time.

The forward button is a little smaller than the back button and can be a little more difficult to press at times when compared to the back button, luckily I use back way more than forward. There’s a hidden gesture button toward the bottom left for your thumb, which works similar to alt+tab on the keyboard and allows you to rotate through your open windows, I personally never found myself using this function, however with the Logitech Options software you can use it in combination with moving the mouse to maximize or snap windows.. Toward the front there’s also 3 LED lights which indicate the battery charge level remaining. When all 3 LEDs are lit green it indicates the mouse is 100% charged. If it goes down to 2 green LEDs it means there’s 66% charge remaining, while 1 green LED represents 33% charge remaining.

MX Master mouse Logitech
MX Master mouse Logitech

Once it reaches 10% remaining the final LED will change to red. When I first saw pictures of the MX Master I was concerned with how the patterned design would feel under my fingers, however I found it quite unobtrusive. I actually prefer it over the rubber material found on previous generations which would degrade and rub off over time, this shouldn’t happen here as it’s all hard plastic. Over on the right there’s not much going on, just the same material and design pattern that we saw on the left thumb area for you to rest your other fingers on.

Again I want to call this out as it’s such an improvement over previous rubber designs, if I use my MX Performance for a while the rubber comes off on my fingers. On the front there’s a single Micro USB port for charging the mouse with the included cable, I was happy to see this rather than some sort of custom cable, as Micro USB is very common. The back of the mouse has a nice rounded curve for your palm to rest on.

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The top of course includes the expected left and right click buttons. In the center is the speed adaptive scroll wheel which is in click-to-click mode by default, and can be changed to hyperfast mode when needed. Click-to-click mode is for precise, ratcheted movement while hyperfast spins freely. You can change between the two manually with the button behind the scroll wheel, otherwise hyperfast mode activates automatically in response to an increased scrolling speed.

If you slow the scroll speed back down it will automatically go back into click-to-click mode. Pressing the scroll wheel in acts as a middle button click. The bottom of the mouse features the Darkfield laser sensor, which tracks really well on a lot of surfaces, even glass above 4mm thick. I’ve been using the mouse primarily on a mousepad and haven’t had any problems here.

The sensor operates normally at 1,000 DPI, but can be changed between 400 to 1,600 in increments of 200 with the Logitech Options software. There’s a power switch for turning the mouse on and off, as well as a button for connecting to Bluetooth and another for changing between the 3 available Bluetooth channels. I’ve been using the mouse mostly with the tiny included wireless USB receiver, which uses the 2.4GHz range and provides a range of up to 10m, however it can also work with up to 3 different Bluetooth devices at once, a good option if you don’t want to use a whole USB port for the mouse on a laptop for example.

By plugging in the USB receiver you will be prompted to install the Logitech Options software, which I thought was a good way of providing the software for the mouse. So how is the MX Master to actually use day to day? After first gripping the mouse straight away it felt very nice and natural to hold, the materials feel nice, especially the rubber scroll wheels under my fingers. It’s easy to move around and I’ve found it to be very accurate.

The clicking is a little louder than I’m used to, but wasn’t a big deal. The mouse buttons felt nice to click, however I would have preferred if the clickable button area went all the way to the middle of the mouse where the scroll wheel is as they did in previous generations. If you have your fingers close to the scroll wheel and try to click you may not correctly press the button in. Speaking of the scroll wheel, this is the best scroll wheel in a mouse I’ve used yet.

In previous generations you could swap to hyperfast scroll by either pressing a button or pressing the scroll wheel itself in, however here you have the normal click-to-click incremental scrolling but if you scroll fast enough it will automatically engage hyperfast scrolling which works really well. I never found myself using the manual override button to change it, the automatic change worked perfectly for me. You can customize what different buttons of the mouse do with the Logitech Options software, however I was more than happy with all the defaults.

From my testing a full battery charge lasts me around 2-3 weeks, however I’d rate myself as being a heavy user. This is thanks to the inbuilt, non-removable, rechargeable 500mAh battery, which Logitech claim will last up to 40 days on a single charge based on 6 hours of use per day, so approximately 240 hours total which is quite good. Even when you do need to charge, it’s not a big deal as you can still use the mouse while it’s plugged in and actively charging which is awesome.

This mouse is definitely designed for right hand users, unfortunately if you’re a left handed mouse user you may need to look elsewhere. Overall to be completely honest, I didn’t really realise that I was using the mouse after a while, which I think is a good thing because it means that the mouse is allowing me to do what I need to without causing me any problems, it just works well. Is it worth the upgrade from the last generation? Possibly not as the MX Performance was a fairly decent mouse, however if you can justify the cost I would recommend the MX Master as it’s just better in every way with great incremental improvements all around.

MX Master mouse Logitech 2

While there’s nothing mind blowingly new here, it’s great to have the Bluetooth option, return of the side scrolling wheel, automatically engaging hyperfast scroll, and improved battery life. The Logitech MX Master mouse is definitely a solid option for essentially anyone, perhaps with the exception of hardcore gamers that may want the lower latency of a wired mouse and extra macro keys.

So what did you guys think of the Logitech MX Master mouse? Be sure to let me know down in the comments along with what mouse you’re currently using and why, or if you have any questions or feedback I’ll be happy to answer. Also leave a share on the post if you found it useful or helpful, and don’t forget to subscribe for future posts like this one.

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